DPF – DIESEL PARTICULATE FILTERS REMOVAL


Many companies encourage the removal of DPF’s by cutting out the DPF and replacing it with a straight tube and then remapping the DPF so that it does not show on the ECU, we work within the law and discourage anyone from doing so, as the onus is on the driver of the vehicle.

If you are having issues with your DPF it may be possible to force a regeneration, or there could be other reasons the best way for a diagnosis is to bring the vehicle to us so we can run a full diagnostic scan to find the best way forward. A faulty DPF can not only cause a loss in performance but will also affect the fuel consumption; the repair must be carried out immediately if the warning light comes on, failure to do so could result in further damage.

WHAT IS A DIESEL PARTICULATE FILTER?
A diesel particulate filter (DPF) is a device that looks similar to a catalytic converter and fits modern diesel vehicles. The primary function is to filter particulate matter (PM) from the burnt exhaust gases. It does this by trapping solid particles while letting gaseous components escape. This type of filter has been in use for over 20 years, and many variants exist. These filters enable reductions in emissions that help meet European emission standards, improving air quality, and thereby health standards.

REGENERATION PROCESS
DPFs are a filter and therefore can become blocked, and needs to be emptied of trapped particulate matter regularly. This process called Regeneration involves burning the soot at a very high temperature, leaving behind only a minimal residue. If the regeneration process fails to complete by itself, it can lead to a build-up of soot, which can affect performance, fuel economy, and ultimately lead to expensive repair costs. When this happens, it has led to some diesel vehicle owners to remove their DPFS. However, DPF removal has both legal and social implications.

LEGAL REQUIREMENTS AND THE MOT TEST
Since February 2014 the inspection of the exhaust system carried out during the MOT test will include a check for the presence of a DPF. A missing DPF or tampered one will result in an MOT failure.

It is an offense under the Road vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations (Regulation 61a (3))1 to use a vehicle that has been modified in such a way that it no longer complies with the air pollutant emissions standards it was designed to meet. Removal of a DPF will almost invariably contravene these requirements, making the vehicle illegal for road use. The potential penalties for failing to comply with Regulation 61a are fines of up to £1,000 for a car or £2,500 for a light goods vehicle.

DPF – DIESEL PARTICULATE FILTERS REMOVAL


Many companies encourage the removal of DPF’s by cutting out the DPF and replacing it with a straight tube and then remapping the DPF so that it does not show on the ECU, we work within the law and discourage anyone from doing so, as the onus is on the driver of the vehicle.

If you are having issues with your DPF it may be possible to force a regeneration, or there could be other reasons the best way for a diagnosis is to bring the vehicle to us so we can run a full diagnostic scan to find the best way forward. A faulty DPF can not only cause a loss in performance but will also affect the fuel consumption; the repair must be carried out immediately if the warning light comes on, failure to do so could result in further damage.

WHAT IS A DIESEL PARTICULATE FILTER?
A diesel particulate filter (DPF) is a device that looks similar to a catalytic converter and fits modern diesel vehicles. The primary function is to filter particulate matter (PM) from the burnt exhaust gases. It does this by trapping solid particles while letting gaseous components escape. This type of filter has been in use for over 20 years, and many variants exist. These filters enable reductions in emissions that help meet European emission standards, improving air quality, and thereby health standards.

REGENERATION PROCESS
DPFs are a filter and therefore can become blocked, and needs to be emptied of trapped particulate matter regularly. This process called Regeneration involves burning the soot at a very high temperature, leaving behind only a minimal residue. If the regeneration process fails to complete by itself, it can lead to a build-up of soot, which can affect performance, fuel economy, and ultimately lead to expensive repair costs. When this happens, it has led to some diesel vehicle owners to remove their DPFS. However, DPF removal has both legal and social implications.

LEGAL REQUIREMENTS AND THE MOT TEST
Since February 2014 the inspection of the exhaust system carried out during the MOT test will include a check for the presence of a DPF. A missing DPF or tampered one will result in an MOT failure.

It is an offense under the Road vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations (Regulation 61a (3))1 to use a vehicle that has been modified in such a way that it no longer complies with the air pollutant emissions standards it was designed to meet. Removal of a DPF will almost invariably contravene these requirements, making the vehicle illegal for road use. The potential penalties for failing to comply with Regulation 61a are fines of up to £1,000 for a car or £2,500 for a light goods vehicle.